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The Faces of Landscape

Program

Contact

Departament of Geography

Faculty of Arts
Campus Barri Vell mapa de situacio
Plaça Ferrater Mora, 1
17071 GIRONA

Phone:

+34 972 418213

+34 972 418117

Email:

dir.depgeografia@udg.edu

 

Lenka Cermakova & Anton Fogas

Prešov University

Minna Tanskanen & Jonna Kosonen

University of Eastern Finland

Josep Vila & Diego Varga

Universitat de Girona

 

Program

General schedule

Detailed schedule

Case studies and landscape research groups

 

General schedule

 

University of Eastern Finland from Sunday 1st May to Saturday 14th May 2011
  

 

University of Eastern Finland (1st week)

Sunday 1st May

 Welcome to Joensuu, arrival at 17:15

Monday 2nd May

 Different ways to define and use the concept of Landscape

Tuesday 3rd May

 The North Karelian landscape

Wednesday 4th May

Field work excursion (I): National landscape and water landscape - Koli

Thursday 5th May

 Field work excursion (II): Forest and mire landscape - Ilomantsi

Friday 6th May

 Field work excursion (III): Dwelled landscape - Polvijärvi

Saturday 7th May

 Free time

Sunday 8th May

 Free Time

 

University of Eastern Finland (2nd week)

Monday 9th May

 Research Group work

Tuesday 10th May

 Research Group work

Wednesday 11th May

 Research Group work

Thursday 12th May

 Research Group work

Friday 13th May

 Research Group presentations and discussion

Saturday 14 th May

 Departure at 8:50


 

Detailed schedule
 

Sunday 1st May

- Welcome to Joensuu, arrival at 17.15

 
Monday 2nd May 

Time

Place

Subject

 

9.30

Pipetti-restaurant

Morning coffee

 

10.00

 

F101

Welcome to the University of Eastern Finland

Rector Perttu Vartiainen

Welcome to the department of geographical and historical studies

Head of department Alfred Colpaert

Opening the course

Josep Vila/Minna Tanskanen

Different ways to define and use the concept of landscape

10.30-11.15

F101

Landscape ecology. An approach from geography

Josep Vila

11.15-12.00

F101

The changes of landscape in Poloniny National Park

Lenka Cermakova

Anton Fogas

 

Pipetti-restaurant

Lunch

 

13.00-13.45

F101

The cultivated mire landscape as a mirror of Finnish society

Minna Tanskanen

13.45-14.30

F101

European Landscape Policies based on the European Landscape Convention. Case studies: Spain, Germany and Slovakia

Stephanie Wilbrand

 

 

Coffee break

 

15.00-16.30

F101

Workshops based on the further readings and the lectures

 Bibliography

 

 

 

Joensuu by walk

Minna Tanskanen and the Finnish students

 

 Tuesday 3rd May
 

Time

Place

Subject

 

The Finnish landscape

9.15-10.00

F101

Gis-based landscape data in Finland

Ari Lehtinen

10.00-10.45

F101

Introduction to Ecosystem Services - basic concepts and definitions, assessment, modeling

Heli Mikkonen

10.45-11.30

F101

Landscaping Finland

Timo Kumpula

 

Pipetti-restaurant

Lunch

 

The North Karelian landscape

13.00-13.45

F101

Geomorphology of North Karelia

Heikki Vesajoki

13.45-14.30

F101

Traditional rural landscapes

Hanna Keski-Karhu

 

 

Coffee break

 

15.00-

F101

An introduction to the study themes Orientation in research groups

Minna Tanskanen


Wednesday 4th May 

- Excursion I - National landscape and water landscape <Joensuu-Koli-Joensuu>
 
Thursday 5th May 

- Excursion II – Forest and mire landscape <Joensuu-Heinävaara-Ilomantsi-Mekrijärvi-Hattuvaara-Suomu/Patvinsuo-Uimaharju-Joensuu>

Friday 6th May 

- Excursion III – Dwelled landscape <Joensuu-Kunnasniemi-Huhmari-Kuorevaara-Polvijärvi-Kinahmo-Ruvaslahti-Martonvaara-Ahmovaara-Kontiolahti-Joensuu>

Monday 9th May

- Working in groups

Tuesday 10th May

- Working in groups

Wednesday 11th May

- Working in groups

Thursday 12th May

- Working in groups

Friday 13th May

- Final seminar at 10.15 in F101

- Final dinner at 19.00

Saturday 14th May

- Departure at 8.50

- See you in Presov, in May 2012!

 

Case studies and landscape research groups


1. Koli – A national Carelian landscape (Iida Pirinen)

Koli is a national park in North Carelia, Eastern Finland. Koli is famous from its beautiful landscape. At top of the highest cliffs opens a wide scenery filled with lakes and forests. This landscape is classified to be one of the Finnish national landscapes. Koli has also a particularly powerful symbolic value. Its Carelian landscape is romanticized and thought to be at the heart of the ”Finnishness”.

Our research is focused to examine the national landscape of the top of Koli. The main research interests are:

  • What is the Carelian national landscape like?
  • Why is the landscape at the top of Koli classified as a national landscape?
  • What kind of history lies behind the development of Koli from scenery into valued national landscape?

2. Urban landscape – Joensuu (Sebastian González López)

In this study we are going to analyse the urban landscape and the planning of it in the central area of Joensuu city. How it has developed and how well the old landscape has been preserved. For this study we are going to use the city's planning schematics for the central area, old photos and the photos taken by the group members.

3. Rural landscape in change (Veera Juusti)

The Finnish rural landscape has been trough big changes during the last decade, e.g. because of the agricultural mechanization. Many of the former vivid rural areas have shifted to municipalities and small villages that struggle for their existence. In our group work we could compare two rural villages, Sotkuma and Sola, which are situated in the municipality of Polvijärvi. Sotkuma has managed to retain its livelihood, whereas Sola is having problems in maintaining services and residents in the village. The objective of the study would be to analyze the reasons for the differences between the villages. Literature about the changes in Finnish rural areas could serve as a theoretical background. We could also search for statistics on the population and age stucture as well as on the service sector in the two villages. The empirical approach could be for example observations of the villages and some short interviews or questionnaires with the residents.

4. Landscape of Recreational Settlements (Maija Sikiö)

There is 314 000 kilometers of shoreline in Finland. This shoreline is divided into sea costs (15 %), lake shores (68 %) and river banks (17 %). Many of the free-time residences or summer cottages are situated in these shorelines. The summer cottage is like a second home and nowadays many of them turns into a permanent dwelling. By the end of the year 2009 there were 485 118 summer cottages in Finland. With a total population of 5.1 million, this means that every fourth household owns a cottage and even more have access to one, since cottages are increasingly used by extended families. According to Periäinen the most obvious motive for having a cottage is the desire to enjoy the short summer in the best possible environment: in the country, in the shade of the trees, by the lake. It involves nostalgia for former home regions and also Finnish sauna tradition is central part of the cottage experience.

The purpose of this research is to understand how the recreational settlements have developed in Finland and in North Karelia and how these settlements affect physical shoreline landscape. The settlements in shoreline areas have an influence on the physical landscape and the environment but also they play a role in mental landscape. What are the pulling forces of recreational settlement? What is important for summer cottage users? Why people spend time in summer cottages and why people want to go there? We will perform couple of interviews to get the idea of the pulling forces. In addition we will make observations about the settlement in shorelines during the excursions. We will also utilize the literature and research done around the subject.

5. Mining landscape (Tomi Härkönen)

During recent years, mining industry has risen strongly in Finland. One of the upcoming mines is located in North Karelia (Kylylahti mine). The research will concentrate to those physical changes in the Finnish landscape which are caused or will be caused by mining industry. One possible way to do that is study the lifespan of mines.

Material: literature, internet sources and excursions.

6. Finnish forestry as a changing force of forest landscape (Pasi Korpelainen)

Aim of this study is how the Finnish forestry has changed forest landscape. We need, for example, to recognize all actors in forestry (companies, private ownership etc.). Forest companies use lot’s of coniferous woods for making pulp and paper. Planting spruce instead of birch is more profitable also for forest owners. This will lead to situation where area of broadleaved forests is decreasing and the landscape is changing as well. We also want to know what kind of role forest policy has on landscape and how policy has changed over the years, for example subsidizing very dense forest road network.

Case study: In our case study we will study change of forest landscape in long period of time in Outokumpu
region. We could take one farm for smaller scale and one bigger forest area for larger scale study.

Data:

  • Aerial photographs from Outokumpu region 1940s, 1970s and 2000
  • Forest plans 1970–1980 / 2000–2010 / 2010–2020

7. Changes in the mire landscape (Teppo Tossavainen)

Bogs and mires are a remarkable part of Finnish landscape and one of the richest ecosystems in Finland. They consist of dead plant material that is transformed into acidic peat in an anaerobic system. Bogs and mires have covered up to one third of Finland’s landmasses and they are considered to be one of the most important sources of energy. Historically the Finnish mires have been utilized in various ways. Our aim is to focus our research on the changes of mire landscapes in North Karelia mostly during the 20th and 21st century. One part of our interest is researching the utilization of mires in different perspectives. Most important part of our study will focus on the different mire landscapes such as physical landscape and mental landscape. It will also be studied what might be the social reasons behind the changes in mire landscapes.

Research material: Excursions to mires, literature and internet sources.
 

Bibliography which workshop is based on

  • Antrop, M (2005) Why landscapes of the past are important for the future. Landscape and Urban Planning, 70, 21-34.
  • Antrop, M (2006). Sustainable landscapes: contradiction, fiction or utopia? Landscape and Urban Planning, 75, 187 – 197.
  • Benediktsson, K., 2007: “Scenophobia”, geography and the aesthetic politics of landscape. Geogr. Ann., 89 B (3): 203–217.
  • Olwig, Kenneth R. (2005). Representation and alienation in the political land-scape. Cultural geographies, 12:19-40.
  • Olwig, Kenneth R. (2007). The practice of landscape 'Conventions' and the just landscape: The case of the European landscape convention, Landscape Research, 32: 5, 579 — 594
  • Tanskanen, Minna (2010). The Cultivated Mires Landscape as a Mirror of Finnish Society. Landscapes, identities and development, 195 – 206.